save mitchell

donate a kidney, a dollar, or a prayer for hope & healing

A gift.

This blog was birthed on February 13, 2012, on the cusp of my two failed attempts to donate one of my kidneys to Mitchell. God put it on my heart to help this young man, that much I knew for sure…and if a kidney wasn’t coming out of my torso, then I would be used in another way.

Savemitchell.com came to life to tell his story, share updates, as well as establish a Facebook page for supporters to follow along on his journey. We’ve raised thousands of dollars, created Save Mitchell dot com t-shirts (over 100 sold and counting), and even had folks make homemade dinners for the family. We chronicled Mitchell’s triumphs outside of the operating room including getting to meet his favorite college basketball team (VCU Rams), watched him graduate high school, and attend Prom.

We’ve also learned about the not-so-glamorous, behind-the-scenes look at life on dialysis. As his Mother candidly said in the recent past, “he’s the sickest he’s ever been.” That statement says a lot considering the guy has been dealing with kidney failure and survived two transplants in the last 11 years. Needless to say, his loved ones and supporters have been clinging onto hope. That someway, somehow, someone would step forward to give the gift of life and be a suitable match.

Enter Jessica.

She emailed the Save Mitchell Facebook page on May 17, asking about his status since the blog had a lapse in updates. My response was:

For a while he was doing well, then him and his Mom went to NC about two weeks ago to visit family, and suffered a complication thru dialysis — he was in a lot of pain. Things seem to be doing better now. No updates on donors. The hospital is working on a ‘domino’ transplant that could involved 8 donors/recipients so the testing and matching process feels like it’s taking forever. Thanks again for reaching out & the support!

Fast forward to a few weeks ago, we learned that someone named Jessica was being tested. In organ donation, the hospital coordinator keeps details confidential to protect everyone involved, including HIPAA laws (patient privacy), so his family & I were grasping for any and all information which was loosely shared. The stories and status changed every few days — one moment we’re talking about people in Missouri and Pennsylvania participating in a domino swap, the next moment we’re focused on fixing his dialysis machine, and the next moment we’re anxiously awaiting any update whatsoever from the transplant unit.

Well today was the day we’ve all been waiting for — this is finally happening in six short days. Mitchell has a donor, and it’s all thanks to sweet, selfless, super hero Jessica. She is donating to a stranger (known as “altruistic”) in need of a kidney in Richmond, VA — and her husband will donate their kidney to Mitchell. Although just like when I tested, Jessica wasn’t a match for Mitchell, the beautiful thing is she’s now saving TWO lives.

The odds of this entire situation happening are slim on multiple levels. For one, given Mitchell’s complicated history and multiple surgeries, has unfortunately made it very difficult to find strong matches; it’s not as simple as having the same blood type — the process is much more involved including antibodies, tissue matching, etc. Additionally, to have the swap take place in the exact same city is amazing. Dealing with dozens of people in a large kidney swap could have delayed the surgery for months, not to mention more room for error. Finally, Jessica is a nursing student and starts school soon — so her timeline to undergo the surgery and build in time to recover is tight. But, by the grace of God, the stars aligned.

Sure many hiccups could take place, causing the surgery to not happen , or complications from the transplant…but we’re not going to focus on that. No-no, we’re not even going to put an ounce of energy into What If? Because life doesn’t work that way — we are only guaranteed today, so let’s put our love and support into a perfect outcome for every single person involved. Let’s let go & let God. Let’s be brave and believe.

I asked Jessica if she’d write a guest blog post to share her perspective, what this experience means to her, and why she was inspired to get involved. She happily obliged and titled it: A Gift. Her story brought me to tears for more reasons than I could ever explain… I’m so grateful for everyone’s support, and lift up Mitchell, his family, Jessica, and her family ~ that Tuesday, August 7 is The Day that Love wins, Faith perseveres, Hope prevails, and we’re no longer here to Save Mitchell ~ rather, Mitchell is saved.

Much love,

Mary Beth

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Saving grace.

Mrs. Lyne: Mitchell is the sickest he’s ever been.

Mary Beth: Wait, you mean, even dating back 11 years…to when he was 8-years-old and needed his first kidney transplant?

Mrs. Lyne: Yes.

That dialogue practically took my breath away.

But, but…how could this be? We just saw him posing in a tuxedo, looking super sharp, for his senior prom. And then standing next to his Grand Daddy on high school graduation, smiling bright. How could he be that sick?

When his potassium and hemoglobin levels dropped last week, the poor fella had to have two blood transfusions. Blood work results came back today, and while the potassium is up a bit, he has not been able to eat *any* food. So hopefully prednisone will do the trick, help the organ inflamation go down, and ultimately help him hold solid food down.

Today was a whirlwind. As his Mother recounted the details to me, I was out of breath just listening to the story. In short, Mitchell’s team of doctors changed their mind a few times. One moment the plan would be to stay put, take the meds, and watch what happens. Another moment, he was ordered to go to the hospital “within the hour” for a possible surgery, and the next…they’re told a living kidney donor has come forward.

A sweet, selfless soul has stepped up to the plate to donate their kidney; this person doesn’t even know Mitchell but is a friend of a friend of a friend. This person doesn’t match Mitchell, so has offered to donate their kidney to a stranger on the waiting list {this is known as an altruistic donation}. By doing so, Mitchell is automatically bumped up to the #1 spot on the kidney waiting list.

This is HUGE. Really, really big news. But he won’t be completely out of the woods yet. You see, because of his complex situation, it will take a very unique kidney to be compatible with his system. Regardless though…putting him at the tippy top could literally be a life saver. A saving grace.

Another insight that put things into perspective was when Mrs. Lyne said the doctor said they’ll let him have a cadaver kidney from a deceased donor. Originally this wasn’t permitted because of Mitchell’s sensitive case {living organs last longer than cadaver organs — and the more transplants you have, the harder it is to make them successful}, but evidently because he is not doing well, the medical team’s point of view is, “we’ll do whatever we need to do to save his life.”

So please keep Mitchell in your thoughts and prayers. Send him your love and support. And as always, consider donating through a dollar, getting tested to be a kidney donor, delivering dinner to the family, or purchasing a SAVE MITCHELL t-shirt. Tomorrow is never guaranteed for any of us, so live today to the fullest.

Much love,

Mary Beth

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Third time is a charm.

The last few months have had lots of highs and an equal amount of lows.

For starters, I finally got to meet Mitchell in person! Well technically I met him when he was 8-years-old, but a lot has changed in 11 years. His parents and I chit chatted away at a diner, while Mitchell stayed quiet for the most part. When he did chime in though, boy was I laughing. The guy has a great sense of humor, and his smile was even brighter in person.

I was blown away when it was time to eat, and a baggy of pills came out. These meds are just another piece of the puzzle that keeps him breathing, and keeps us hoping that a selfless kidney donor will step up to the plate and save his life. The trooper takes dozens and dozens of pills every single day; they put my vitamin intake to shame. By the time I snapped this shot, he had already swallowed a mouthful.

Mitchell recently went to his senior Prom! Although initially apprehensive, friends and students encouraged him to attend. Men’s Warehouse was nice enough to donate his sharp-looking tux. Of course Mitchell picked Tarheel Blue as a nod to his favorite North Carolina basketball team. They had a fun night and his Mom was patiently waiting for a call to come pick him up, assuming he wouldn’t feel very well or make it out too late. She was wrong! Mitchell experienced an unusual second wind and hung out with fellow graduates all night long.

Around this time, Mitchell and his Mom made a road trip to visit his Grandparents down south. The trip was monumental because it would be the first time they’d be managing his dialysis treatments remotely / away from home. Everything was going well until the very end. Because of complications, they had to stay over a few extra days until they stabilized him, then headed home.

For several weeks Mitchell’s Mom was getting frustrated because the dialysis machine wasn’t working properly. It seemed as though too much fluid was being removed from him, which caused nausea and an upset stomach / unable to hold food down. Thankfully they were eventually able to have a new machine replaced by the clinic…and things appeared to be getting better.

Then, on a perfectly routine day, while Mrs. Lyne was going about her daily errands — her car was hit — hard. It wasn’t pretty. She suffered several injuries and has been in physical therapy ever since. Most folks could take medication to help alleviate the pain , but not her.

“I need to be available for Mitchell in the middle of the night to check on dialysis treatments, so I can’t afford to be knocked out on pain pills.”

And that, my friends, is why we call her an Angel on earth. She always puts others first, even at her own expense.

As with most car insurance claims, of course this experience wasn’t a pleasant one. It took over a week to get the paperwork processed and car value assessment. The rental car was only approved for a short amount of time, and finding a replacement for their truck wasn’t looking promising. You see, this particular SUV was perfect for transporting Mitchell to and from doctor’s appointments, dialysis clinic visits, and filling prescriptions.

“It rides so smooth. So even if Mitchell wasn’t feeling well, the car ride wouldn’t make him more uncomfortable.”

Mrs. Lyne was really disappointed for this loss, not to mention it’s extremely important in her business — landscaping. This was a double-whammy.

Being out of work due to her injuries means she isn’t making money to support her family, and summertime is the one season she is normally guaranteed work. Losing the transportation vehicle to bring Mitchell in for doctor’s check-ups AND unable to use her trusted vehicle for landscaping supplies was a grim reality.

But by the grace of God, a kind-hearted man learned about the Lyne’s circumstances and cut them a break. They now have another SUV and are grateful to be back up and running.

 

Last week, Mitchell graduated from high school. What an awesome, awesome day. He worked diligently with a tutor and earned every piece of that 11×18 diploma. Although home schooled for the better part of the last few years, his classmates have cheered him on from the sidelines, even posting banners and posters around school with encouraging words of support. Here he is standing next to a very proud Grandfather.

Now, exactly 8 days later, he is laying in a hospital bed. Welcome to the world of a young man fighting for his life, and waking up every morning not knowing what to expect.

Earlier this week, his hemoglobin and potassium numbers were decreasing — which left him feeling very ill. Then yesterday tests were run and the numbers continued to go down, so he was immediately admitted and told he’d need a blood transfusion. While this is a necessary procedure to keep our courageous fighter alive, unfortunately it also means he’ll have a tougher time getting a living kidney donor. The transfusion lasted until 3am, and 5 short hours later, this morning was scheduled to see Gastroenterology specialists and determine if he has internal bleeding.

It seems fitting that I’m scheduled to donate blood this Tuesday. I try to go regularly, and not let time lapse between the minimum amount of time I’m allowed to give, approximately every 50 days. When I’m laying in that chair, I’ll think of Mitchell and hope that others are out there doing the same — saving a life by such a simple act.

Another way to help is to purchase a SAVE MITCHELL t-shirt. For each one sold, $15 is donated to help off-set his medical expenses. Click here to learn more about how buying and wearing a shirt will help you raise awareness for Mitchell and his journey of keeping hope alive.

Please continue to keep Mitchell, his Mother, Father, and siblings in your thoughts and prayers. The road doesn’t get any easier, and life has a way of keeping us on our tippy toes. While most high school graduates are enjoying their summer, and anticipating the milestone of college around the corner, Mitchell is strictly focused on his health. He’s decided to forgo pursuing college until a shiny new organ is in his abdomen. When the day comes, it will be his third donated kidney.

As they say — third time is a charm!

Much love,

Mary Beth

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Kidney Donor ~ Myth busters

Thanks to the wonders of social media, I’ve come across several informative sites & blogs dedicated to educating people on kidney donation as well as advocating for recipients waiting for a match.

The Kidney Chronicles is penned by a living kidney donor, Tom, who gave the gift of life to Brenda in 2007.

In this particular post [see below], he captured the most frequent questions from other potential donors. I found the answers not only extremely informative, but equally refreshing.

Please take a moment to read this piece, and then share with others.

“When you know better, you do better.”  -Maya Angelou

Much love,

Mary Beth

Ask The Kidney Donor

By Tom Simon

I’ve been answering a lot of email questions lately from prospective kidney donors trying to decide whether to go forward with the procedure. The same questions always seem to crop up. Here they are:
I’m thinking of donating a kidney and my friends and family are freaking out! What should I tell them?

I’m happy to answer any questions, but I don’t want you to think I’m talking you into donating. It is a very personal issue, and you should make it based upon the facts of your life.

My friend Virginia Postrel wrote a great article called: “Here’s Looking at You, Kidney: How and why I became an organ donor — and how I kept people from talking me out of it.”
http://www.dynamist.com/articles-speeches/opeds/kidney.html

Her article started me thinking about donating, and her patience with my many dumb questions helped me during my own discernment process.

Most family members’ objections boil down to:
1. Fear of the surgery 2. Fear of living with one kidney

Remind your friends and family of the following things:
The donation of a kidney is laparoscopic surgery, meaning small incision and quicker recovery. Most donors are out of the hospital on the next day, back at work in two weeks, and back to normal in a month. The surgery is no more dangerous than any procedure done under general anesthesia. The anesthesia is the real risk factor. Check out your doctor and transplant center. Get comfortable with both. Ask a lot of questions.

There is no scientific evidence in 50 years of living kidney donations that there are any ill effects to living with one kidney. Within five weeks of donation, the remaining kidney swells in size and increases its filtering power (the “glomerular filtration rate”) to match the power of two kidneys. In short, you’ll have a single super-kidney instead of two simply adequate kidneys.

When kidney disease occurs, it nearly always strikes both kidneys at the same time. It’s not like one kidney fails and you find yourself knocking on wood, thankful that you’ve got a spare. If I should develop kidney disease, I will need treatment or a transplant – just like I’d need if I had two kidneys. If a kidney donor needs a transplant, they go straight to the front of the line on the kidney transplant list, which seems like a very fair deal to me.
What about saving your kidney in case one of your kids needs it someday?
This is the best argument I’ve heard against donating. That said, I couldn’t justify not saving a life today because it might inhibit my ability to possibly save one in the future. My wife has a spare kidney for them, and we both have loving families who may be willing to help if one of my kids is in need of a kidney. Moreover, neither my family nor my wife’s has any history of kidney disease, obesity, or diabetes.
What if something happens to your remaining kidney and you end up needing your second one?
Again, my family has no history of kidney disease. When kidney disease occurs, it nearly always strikes both kidneys at the same time. It’s not like one kidney fails and you find yourself knocking on wood, thankful that you’ve got a spare. If I should develop kidney disease, I will need treatment or a transplant – just like I’d need if I had two kidneys. If a kidney donor needs a transplant, they go straight to the front of the line on the kidney transplant list, which seems like a very fair deal to me.
What if the transplant fails? It will have been a waste!
It happens. Then you will probably feel a real sadness but no regret about your ultimate decision. All you can do is all you can do. The rest is up to the doctors, God, and your recipient’s body. Blood donors don’t expect accountability and ultimate success regarding the ultimate success of their donations. Kidney donors shouldn’t expect it either.
Have you had any residual pain or a feeling as if something is “missing?”
Nope, not even a little. In fact, if this were a science-fiction thriller where I was “missing” the memory of the 6 months following surgery, I would not have known it happened at all. Except for some small scars on my abdomen (see below).
The recovery process works in stages where there is some abdominal swelling (only you and your pants will notice) and the incision points will be tender for maybe six weeks after the surgery, but nothing permanent.
I found myself rather sleepy at night for six months following the surgery (like 9:30 p.m., rather than 11:00 p.m.). I think I was still healing internally. I think that evolved into a habit where I now go to bed earlier than I once did. I don’t think this is kidney-related as much as I just became accustomed to being well-rested and getting an appropriate amount of sleep. I only mention it because I have spoken to many others who found themselves rather sleepy at night long after the pain of the surgery had gone away.
Have you had to make any significant changes in your diet and/or exercise routines?
Not really. No more knife fighting for me. I used to be an amateur boxer, but I gave that up long before my surgery. Had I continued boxing through the time of my surgery, it would have been wise for me to stop since repeated blunt trauma to the one remaining kidney could evolve into a melancholy situation.
There are some drugs synthesized in the kidneys, such as ibuprofen, that you may want to avoid as to not over-task your remaining kidney. Tylenol is fine. I still take ibuprofen once in a while because it works better.
I’ve been a strict vegetarian for nearly 20 years. In theory, I guess it would be unwise for me to start gorging on buttsteaks, become obese, and contract Type 2 Diabetes. But that would be a dumb idea anyway… A kidney donation should not affect your diet.
Will I have to give up drinking alcohol?
There are a million reasons to quit drinking, but a kidney donation is not one of them. Feel free to drink all you please. The liver takes the beating from your boozing, not the kidney.
How have your scars healed?
There are three scars. The two right beneath my left ribcage look like healed bullet holes which accentuates my gangsta image. The three inch scar along the elastic-line of my boxer shorts is generally hidden from the public. None of them are particularly unsightly. They are pinker than my skin, but I did absolutely nothing to treat them or care for them. Now that I live in Hawaii, they’re probably getting too much sun.
This may call for some airbrushing when you appear in a 2010 swimsuit calendar, but I’m certain you won’t be alone.

Have you seen any changes in your overall health?
None whatsoever. My blood-work continues to be far within the normal range, and I feel like a million bucks. Again, I want to stress, there is absolutely no difference in my health or my life before and after (pending recovery) the procedure.

What have you learned?
From a public policy perspective, I think “altruistic” donors should consider starting a kidney chain where they could save a dozen lives with their kidney, rather than just one. Here’s a great article describing how it works:
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200907u/kidney-donation

These were less common a few years ago when I set out to give away a kidney, and I’m overjoyed to have helped my recipient, Brenda. But for people who have no recipient in mind, kidney chain donations clearly do the most good for the most people.

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March madness

What a whirlwind the last two weeks have been. March madness is in full swing.

First, acts of kindness exploded in full force, allowing Mitchell to be treated like a superstar for an evening, recounted in this blog post. The courageous guy, fighting for his life, got to enjoy himself by watching his favorite college basketball team up close & personal. No really, check out his view from right behind the players’ bench.

Then, if that wasn’t amazing enough, a local TV new station decided to cover the superstar “story.” You see, in my former life I worked in the news. One of my roles was to read press releases and decide which pitches were newsworthy. Because of this experience, it helps me in my current marketing/PR roles at work…and luckily…during my free time convince reporters to give pro bono publicity for a sweet 18-year-old who needs a kidney. In this case the spin went something like this: The Virginia Commonwealth University basketball team plays George Mason at the Siegel Center tonight. But while most fans will be focused on the rivalry, they won’t realize there is an extra special young man in the stands….meet Mitchell Lyne.

The clip can be watched here: Mitchell Lyne Needs a Kidney to Live

Please post the link on your social media pages, send an email to contacts, or spread the word in conversations among friends and family. If it gets in the right hands, who knows, maybe a kidney donor is right around the corner.

In addition to that night of magical memories, another meaningful mission is in the works.

A few months ago I moved to Baltimore and started working at Johns Hopkins in the marketing & communications department. The irony of this connection + being a potential donor to Mitchell is outlined in this blog post. Well I took a shot in the dark and asked Mitchell’s sister Stacey & his Mom if they would consider having him sent to Hopkins for a second opinion. Seeing as though he has received care by the same hospital in Richmond for over a decade, I completely understand why the family feels loyalty. At the same time though, there really is nothing to lose by seeking extra eyes and hands on Mitchell’s medical records. He has had so many complications and condition isn’t getting any better {case in point, his first full day of dialysis was delayed due to a stomach lining infection ~ it is extremely painful & can even be fatal}. You just never know…and don’t want to ever wonder: What if?

Low & behold, they decided to go for it!

Even though the hospital doesn’t accept his insurance. Even though the world-renowned kidney transplant expert is incredibly busy. Even though the administration team is swamped. Even though…all of these hurdles, God had other plans. Mitchell & his Mom are headed to Baltimore in two weeks for a consultation with the same doctor who has performed over 1,000 kidney transplant surgeries, has appeared on network TV in the reality series Hopkins 24, was part of the first-ever 5-way kidney swap transplant, and regularly travels all over the world giving talks to his peers.

He has no idea who I am. I’ve passed Dr. Robert Montgomery in the hospital halls {to be fair, you really can’t miss him or his distinct beard}. I’ve read countless articles about him. I’ve even sat in his office for a meeting with his colleagues {and completely got distracted by framed photos hanging on the wall, standing next to several American Presidents}. I’ve secretly hoped, from Day 1, that he would meet Mitchell. Yes there are hundreds of brilliant physicians at the esteemed #1 hospital in the United States, but for whatever reason Dr. Montgomery has been singed on my kidney heart.

Ironically, I haven’t even met Mitchell face-to-face, and will get to look at him in the eyes for the first time, on the same day he gets to meet the Hopkins family. I am looking forward to hearing what comes from this Meeting of Hope — and excited to see what else God has up His sleeves. He continues to use me in ways I could have never imagined, and give the master innovator every ounce of credit.

Much love,

Mary Beth

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The amazing kidney

Just a little bit about what the kidney’s do and how they work….. THEY ARE AMAZING!

Kidneys don’t always get the respect they deserve. Maybe, it’s because they’re relatively small. Maybe, it’s because when they’re functioning normally, we simply take them for granted. But, kidneys are truly impressive and the more you learn, the more you’ll understand why you want to help keep them healthy.

Another word for kidney is renal. You may hear your doctor talk about renal function or read materials that mention renal failure. Whenever you see or hear the word renal, you will know the subject is about kidneys.

Location and description

The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs about five-inches long, three-inches wide and one-inch thick located in your back on each side of your spine. Each kidney is about the size of a fist and weighs from four to six ounces. They are situated above your waist, with the left kidney a little higher and a little larger. The right kidney is a little lower and smaller to make room for the liver. The lower ribs protect your kidneys.

Inside the kidneys are nephrons. These are tiny units where the filtering of excess fluids and dissolved particles occurs. There are between 1.0 and 1.3 million nephrons in each kidney.

What kidneys do

Most people think their kidneys are just responsible for producing urine, but there’s a lot more to it. In addition to removing extra fluid and water from your body, kidneys:
■Filter the blood
■Balance fluid content in the body
■Produce the enzyme renin that helps control blood pressure
■Produce the hormone erythropoietin to help make red blood cells
■Activate vitamin D to maintain healthy bones
■Adjust levels of minerals and other chemicals to keep the body working properly

How kidneys do their jobs

The basic function of kidneys begins when you eat and drink. After the body takes the nutrients it needs, the extras become wastes. Some of the waste winds up in the blood and needs to be filtered out. The blood gets circulated through the body with every beat of the heart. It’s the job of the kidneys—with their millions of nephrons—to filter and clean out the blood and remove the extra fluids. The extra fluid and waste becomes urine and travels from the kidneys down the ureters to the bladder until eliminated through the urethra.

Removing waste is only one job of the kidneys. In addition to filtering, the kidneys monitor the levels of chemicals, salts and acids in the blood. Inside the nephrons are sensors that keep track of sodium, phosphorus, calcium and potassium. When levels are high, the kidneys signal to remove the excess from your blood for elimination.

Another important job of the kidneys is to monitor and regulate certain body functions. An enzyme called renin is secreted by the kidneys to control blood pressure. A hormone called erythropoietin tells the bone marrow to make red blood cells, and one called calcitriol helps to keep bones strong.

Inside the kidneys

Inside each kidney is approximately one million tiny filtering units called nephrons. Each nephron has a glomerulus and tubules. The glomerulus is a series of specialized capillary loops where water and small particles are filtered from the blood. The waste and extra fluids then travel through the tube-like structure of the tubules where several processes take place to turn those fluids into urine. The tubules lead to the collecting duct where the urine is drained into a funnel-shaped sac called the renal pelvis. Each kidney has a ureter that connects the renal pelvis to the bladder. The urine from the kidneys flows down the ureters into the bladder and is then passed out of the body through the urethra.

Summary

It is amazing when you think of everything the kidneys do for the body. It’s even more amazing that some people are born with only one kidney and it does a fine job of filtering blood, producing urine and regulating certain functions all by itself. There are situations when kidneys can no longer perform their job, which leads to kidney failure. We are fortunate, however, to live in a time when treatments such as dialysis and kidney transplant will keep the body alive after kidneys stop functioning.

Save Mitchell

If you would like to consider making the ultimate gift to Mitchell, the gift of life, please click here for information on how to get tested.

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Little miracles

Taking showers. Going for a run. Enjoying my favorite meal with an abundant appetite. Sleeping in my bed, in any position I choose. Going to work/school/social activities as I please. Having a comfortable full night’s rest. Hitting the gym. Fending for myself without thinking twice.

I can’t help but appreciate all of these ‘luxuries’ — also known as everyday activities — that are at my disposal. Yet, Mitchell’s current reality is far from mine.

  • He can’t hop under hot water for a full body cleanse — the catheter healing for dialysis treatments to begin soon doesn’t permit a traditional shower for one whole month.
  • Devouring a delicious dinner to his heart’s desire isn’t necessarily possible. The countless medications, procedure side effects, and unpredictability in appetite on any given day — make the basic function of eating an indefinite: TBD.
  • Slipping into an eight-hour sleep, in the comfort of his bed, is a distance memory. Instead, the sofa chair is his place of rest; usually his Mother is within arm’s reach.

Every single morning I start my prayers by thanking God for blessings — the simple ones — my five senses, my working limbs, my mental, emotional & physical health, my education and employment. Access to clean, running water.

These days, Mitchell inevitably pops into my mind at some point during the dialogue of gratitude, and I think how lucky I am to have it pretty darn easy.

As I’m slowly starting to understand the daily grind of Mitchell’s life, it forces me to reflect on how effortless it is to take common, expected ‘luxuries’ for granted.

The people closest to him never speak his name without commenting on Mitchell’s resiliency and quiet strength. “He never complains, ever” — which makes me think he isn’t human. How could someone in his condition not peep a problem? But the thing is, he is human, a very special human who accepts his uphill road with a grandiose amount of grace.

Because my Monday through Friday appears vastly easier than his, the moment his Mother mentioned how much Mitchell enjoys watching VCU {the local university} basketball games, I knew he had to attend one, stat. For one, the last game of the season was only a few days away. Additionally…he hasn’t been able to snag tickets because every single home game is sold out, due to the rise in popularity from last season’s Final Four run. Now all we needed was a little magic.

With a few strokes of the keyboard & putting a call out to the masses, a kind soul named Cindy offered to secure two tickets for the fan and a guest {by default, Mitchell’s Mom selflessly selected his Dad} — courtesy of the Associate Coach Mike Rhoades who is a friend of a friend. Then another kind soul who came across my call-for-action, Tom, stepped up to the plate with the equivalent of a big black and yellow bow.

He said, “My Mom works at the hospital transplant unit, I think she knows Mitchell. She’d like to help do something special.” Twenty-four hours later he rang my phone to announce, “She made some phone calls and arranged to have Mitchell meet the VCU basketball team before the game. We’re also getting a ball signed with the players’ signatures.” To top it off, VCU managed to get his Mom a ticket too, so now the whole family can be together.

My wish is that tonight, if even for a few minutes or a few hours, Mitchell is able to enjoy himself and not focus on his body’s fight over the last decade. He can act his age, have fun cheering on a live sports game, and make memories that he actually wants to remember.

Life is stuffed with light & love. And if you pay close enough attention, little miracles.

Much love,

Mary Beth

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Going the extra mile

Mitchell had it pretty rough the last week & a half. “When it rains, it pours” was evidently the theme.

First, the surgery to have a dialysis port inserted into his abdomen was painful, as expected. But then he suffered from severe pain in his shoulder (air got in during surgery)…and the heating pad to help alleviate the discomfort ultimately caused 2nd degree burns!

Thankfully he received some medication to help heal burn inflamation, and the port wound is getting better too.

He is slated to begin receiving dialysis treatments on March 12. In the meantime, the family karts back and forth to the dialysis center every week. Once 3/12 rolls around, the Lyne’s will be trained at the center for one week… to eventually give the treatments at home.

Today was particularly hard because a relentless headache, which started yesterday, wouldn’t budge. He asked for over-the-counter medication for some relief. To give you some context, he has had about 6 Tylenol pills in his entire life. In other words, he is naturally tough and never complains. Hopefully Mitchell will feel better soon!

It didn’t even occur to me until talking to his Mom that the rising gas prices must put a huge dent on their wallets. It is 50 miles roundtrip to the dialysis center, and over 20 miles to the hospital for check-ups. Add that all together and we’re talking hundreds of dollars.

If you’d like to contribute any amount of money to help offset the expenses of commuting trip gas (rising 20 more cents per gallon by this weekend), please click here for an easy PayPal Donation. If you don’t already have a PayPal account, it’s free and simple to create one.

The Lyne family have not asked for anything other than prayers, but sometimes… going the extra mile involves giving in more ways than one. In this case ~ gasoline.

Much love,

Mary Beth

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Paying it forward

Mitchell had an operation on Monday to have a port inserted into his abdomen. He will begin dialysis in the next 2-4 weeks, depending on how quickly the wound heals.

If that alone isn’t tough enough, he inadvertently had even more complications to endure — air got trapped during surgery which caused severe pain in his shoulder. Then… a heating pad to help with the pain ended up burning him.

His guardian angel on earth, also known as his Mother, took Mitchell to the ER and we’re thrilled to share that he is finally feeling better today. It should take 2-3 weeks, with wound care, for the burns to heal.

 ∞

Meanwhile, there is an incredible story of selfless donor heros in this Sunday’s New York Times newspaper. Sixty people and 30 kidneys are all linked through the gift of life.

“It is considered a quirk of evolution that humans have two kidneys when they need only one to filter waste and remove excess fluid from the body. Yet when kidneys fail, whether from diabetes or high blood pressure or genetic disorders, they tend to fail in tandem.

Death can arrive in a matter of weeks for many renal patients if they do not have their blood cleansed through dialysis. The process takes almost four hours, three times a week, and leaves many too drained to work. Only half of dialysis patients survive more than three years.”

This isn’t Mitchell’s first rodeo; he has experienced dialysis before. If there could be a silver lining uncovered in this difficult circumstance, it would be that his family will be trained to give treatments at home. The ability to stay in and not have to travel back & forth to the hospital several times a week is an invaluable gift of time.

He didn’t respond well to hemodialysis in the past.

So this time he will receive PD {peritoneal dialysis}.

In the spirit of paying it forward, if you would like to do so for the Lyne family, there are several options:

  • Contact the MCV organ swap coordinator and get tested as a kidney donor for Mitchell. Click here for more information.
  • Make a monetary donation to help offset the extraordinary amount of medications, many of which are not covered by insurance. Click here for more information.
  • Volunteer to make homemade dinners or have takeout meals delivered to the Lyne residence. Email marybeththomsen@hotmail.com for more information on coordinating & scheduling dates.

Much love,

Mary Beth

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Prayer request

My heart breaks this morning as Mitchell heads BACK to MCV.

He’s going to the ER to have a few things assessed; he’s in a lot of pain.  Mitchell has many underlying conditions and one is osteoporosis.  This can cause joint and muscle pain, and makes him susceptible to other orthopedic injuries.

During his surgery on Monday, they had his body in many awkward positions in order to perform the procedure [a port was placed in his abdomen so he can begin dialysis].  Since his surgery, he’s had severe shoulder pain.  The doctors think that he may have sustained an injury from his surgery.

To help with some of the his post-operative pain, Mitchell used a heating pad on his back.  Unfortunately, his skin is extremely sensitive, so the heating pad caused burns and blisters–maybe as severe as 2nd degree burns!  So this morning, Mitchell makes the painful trip to the VCU Health Center’s emergency room to endure more testing!

Please pray for my brother, and for our heart-broken mother who stays helplessly by his side!

In His name,

Stacey

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